from 2004 September 28 to 2005 June 30, to compare their locations with our slip distribution. Ramon Martinez of Monterey Co. Public Works checks a crack in a bridge from an earthquake Tuesday, Sep. 28, 2004 in Parkfield, Calif. 2004 Parkfield earthquake. 1 With predicted climate change, the future league table of natural disaster is likely to remain dominated by the burden of temperature extremes, storms, droughts, and floods rather than angry clashes between neighboring geological structures. 2 …

Official US statistics for 1979–2004 covering over 21,000 deaths associated with natural events showed that three quarters were due to extremes of heat or cold. As John Varian, owner of the Parkfield Inn, put it: “There’s no skyscrapers to fall down so it’s never a big deal.” Tuesday’s temblor, which …

Following earthquakes in 1857, 1881, 1901, 1922, 1934, and 1966, scientists predicted an earthquake to hit Parkfield in 1993. AVAILABILITY OF BOOKS AND MAPS OF THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Instructions on ordering publications of the U.S. Geological …

At about 10:15 a.m. Pacific time, a magnitude-6.0 earthquake shook the tiny town of Parkfield, Calif., a place that geologists have wired with GPS instruments, seismometers and a variety of other tools for measuring earthquakes. We used the relocated aftershock sequence of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake of Thurber et al.

The “1987 Parkfield earthquake” finally struck in September 2004. Fortunately all of the equipment was still there, but it was no help from the perspective of earthquake prediction. The San Simeon quake could have triggered the 6.0 parkfield earthquake in 2004, because the segment of the San Andreas that ruptured in 2004, was the same area that had the highest amount shaking than any other area of the fault. With time, some instruments were upgraded or replaced, a few died, and a few were forgotten, but the majority of the monitoring effort continued and most of the instruments at Parkfield were operational at the time of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Because of the timing and distance of this event with the 2004 Parkfield earthquake, there may be a correlation between the events.

The fault divides into three segments, each with different characteristics and a different degree of earthquake risk. A final analysis of the Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami is likely to create a death toll in 2004 greater than any caused by ground shaking in more than four centuries. An elementary school in Parkfield was evacuated. One salient feature is the horizontal level delineated by small aftershocks around 5–6 km depth ( Fig. Interestingly, the Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault ruptured in a magnitude 6 quake on September 28, 2004, only nine months after the end of Nadeau's analysis period. It forms the tectonic boundary between the Pacific Plate and the North American Plate, and its motion is right-lateral strike-slip (horizontal). The largest earthquake in the United States last year was a magnitude 6.8 in southeastern Alaska. The 2004 Parkfield earthquake: Test of the electromagnetic precursor hypothesis Stephen K. Park,1 William Dalrymple,1 and Jimmy C. Larsen1 Received 30 November 2005; revised 1 December 2006; accepted 7 December 2006; published 5 May 2007. Earthquake Research at Parkfield, California, for 1993 and Beyond- . The Mw 6.0 earthquake on the San Andreas fault on 9/28/2004 at 10:17AM PDT fulfilled some, but not all elements of the original 1985 earthquake forecast for Parkfield (see the Parkfield Prediction Experiment for background on the scientific basis and seismic history of the region).

Although smaller, the most noteable U.S. earthquake was a magnitude 6.0 quake in Parkfield, Calif., on Sept. 28, 2004. The earthquake near Bakersfield did not occur on the San Andreas fault. The NCEDC is serving as a collection point for data related to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. At 10:15 am, 7 miles south of Parkfield, the San Andreas ruptured 17 miles, and caused a 6.0. An early analysis of last month’s magnitude 6 earthquake in Parkfield has led state geologists to reconsider prevailing theories of how shaking radiates from a quake’s epicenter. Employees in The second change in fault strength occurred in conjunction with a magnitude 6 earthquake at Parkfield in September 2004. The epicenter of the event was particularly close to the tremor region, and there might be a relationship between the tremor activity and the occurrence of the September Parkfield earthquake, Nadeau said. After 20 years of waiting, the most scientifically watched segment of the San Andreas Fault delivered a large earthquake yesterday. The 6.5 Colinga earthquake in 1983 could have released stress for 20 years, but why not the 6.5 San Simeon earthquake in 2003? The largest earthquake in the U.S. in 2004 was a magnitude 6.8 in southeastern Alaska. The slip rate along the fault … There were no significant precursors to the 2004 Parkfield earthquake in any of the parameters measured, including seismicity, harmonic tremor, strain (rock deformation), magnetic field, the conductivity of the rock, or creep, and … Map showing M>2 aftershocks following the September 28, 2004 M6.0 earthquake in Parkfield, CA. The quake caused no injuries and minimal property damage, but was of great interest to American geologists.

In 2002, 1711 people died as a result of earthquakes. Below the map is a cross-section showing earthquake depth along the fault within the dashed red box.